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  • Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2017 Wrap-up

    Saturday

    This year's festival felt a bit different for some reason. Maybe it was the unusually cold, rainy weather. I used to take a bus with my LYS, but they closed this past year so I ventured out on my own Saturday. The weather was a concern since the night before I had put rainbow hair chalk in my newly bleached hair. I was worried I would end up looking like a drowned unicorn, but for the most part it was just misting on and off throughout the day. The illusion was safe.

    I had thought to give a free guided tour on Saturday but I didn’t get any RSVPs and it looked to be a soggy mess anyway. Also new this year, the festival was charging $5 admission. I admit I thought there would be a big line at the gate, but I had pre-paid using the app and thankfully there was no wait. One thing noticeably missing was the big Maryland Sheep and Wool sign at the gate. I kind of missed it. I feel like the entrance used to be more fun when they had yarn bombing leading up the path. I’m not sure why they don’t do it anymore.

    A welcoming sight was the Rare Opportunity Bakehouse where I bought some fresh baked cookies. They usually run out pretty fast so I made sure to buy some on my way in. They have some amazing vegan peanut butter cookies and chocolate peanut butter brownies that I went off the sugar wagon for.

    Baked goods in hand, I made my way up the hill to the Skein and Garment Competition building.

    This year I entered a couple skeins of art yarn and two photos (for the first time) and I needed to check and see how I did. To my surprise I got 1st and 3rd place ribbons in the art yarn category and a 3rd place for a black and white portrait of a BFL sheep.

    My first yarn is called “A Walk on the Beach as I Remember it” and the other is “May the Force Be with You”. Both are story yarns that I spun for the Twist Exhibition. The Beach yarn is comprosed of a collection of shells and driftwood from a walk with my father last summer on the beach in the town where I grew up.

    The other yarn represents the themes and hero’s journey in the Star Wars sagas through use of color and symbolism. In a bold move, I turned on the LED lights on my Star Wars yarn that was sitting on the table. I also pulled forward the vintage R2D2 and Chewbacca charms and some of the elements so people could see them. The LEDs represent the light sabers and I wanted people to see the full effect. The white-gloved volunteers guarding the entries must have thought I was a little nutty. But it was meant to be viewed with the dueling lights.

    One thing I hope they could  improve in the future is the display of the novelty/expressive yarns. It’s really hard to see all the elements when it is twisted in a skein and I’d love to see them hanging on the wall displays. Although the fiber art world is making strides with this category, I feel like it’s still not well understood or appreciated as stand alone pieces rather than just material for a garment or larger compilation.

    When walking outside I saw this beautiful shawl and I kind of stealth snapped a shot of it as she walked by. I wanted to ask her what pattern she used, but she was too quick and got away. Plus I didn’t want her to think I was stalking her. Even though I was definitely chasing her for a bit to snap a couple photos ;)

    Next stop was the Main Exhibition Hall where I was consigning yarn at Folktale Fibers and Middlebrook Fiberworks booth again this year.

    Besides dropping off yarn and saying hello, I also wanted to scoop up a skein of Anne’s new line of Vintage No. 2 yarn. It’s a special blend of locally grown 40% Cormo x Merino lamb's wool, 35% superfine Shetland, 15% prime alpaca, and 10% cultivated silk that she hand dyes. It’s beautifully soft and luxurious with subtle light blue color that would go beautifully with just about anything.

    Another crowd favorite is Loop. I snagged a rainbow center-pull bullseye bump and some loose carded fiber in my favorite hot pink and turquoise colors. I seem to have a collection of these bullseyes that I haven’t spun yet. They are too pretty to spin!

    Strauch Fiber Equipment - home of the Mad Batt'r. 'nuff said.

    I stopped by to say hi to the ladies at Solitude Wool in their usual spot in the Main Hall. They were featuring the beautiful Clearview sweater pattern by Amy Herzog in their Coopworth sport yarn. It makes me wish I could knit better.

    This year, Maryland Sheep and Wool featured Romney sheep so this was right up their alley. One of the very first raw fleeces I bought was a Romney from Solitude Farm, and I think it’s a nice all around breed that can be used for a variety of projects. Although classified as a longwool, it is more of a medium staple length and can be pretty soft. It’s good for new spinners and even better if you haven’t scoured a fleece before because it is not as temperamental or greasy as a fine wool. They’re a cute looking sheep too, ranging in white to various shades of natural colors. If you get a chance to go to one of their open houses in scenic Northern Virginia, you can see their fiber flock up close and purchase hand dyed yarn made from their wool.

    My fiber friends Christiane and Melissa were a joy to see at Wild Hare / ThreeRavens. They are so talented and share my love of vivid colors and art textures.

    After making the rounds at the Main building, I went outside to see some of the outside vendors and sheep in the show ring. Near the main gate is a beautiful booth run by Dalis of Dancing Leaf Farm. She sells beautiful hand dyed yarn and hand felted wearables and is always fun to stop and have a chat with. She was one to appreciate my rainbow hair roots.

    I passed by some Jacob, Bluefaced Leicester, and other longwool breeds being shown.

    I was particularly impressed with a young girl who took great care and pride in showing her sheep. She was all smiles and really seemed to be enjoying the whole process.

    I waited in line for my favorite vegetarian food vendor, Artichoke French. It started to rain but it was so worth it. I googled the recipe and I think I’m going to try to make some at home.

    After stuffing my face, I had the energy to brave the fleece sales. The crowds had actually gone away and a huge improvement from last year was adding a tent at the back for checking out. There seemed like a lot more room to maneuver and I took some time looking at fleece.

    I found two Finn fleeces that I loved. They were pretty pricey (this show seems to have prices jacked up a bit) but I thought they were worth the splurge. One was coated and felt like pristine clouds of soft fluff so I knew I’d enjoy washing it. I also bought a white merino that was not coated and I knew would be a little more work.

    Sunday

    I returned on Sunday and met up with my friend Kristin (August Moon Farm). We made our way to the Main Exhibition Hall. I wanted to buy my first Bosworth spindle and I was sooooo excited.

    I decided on a small zebra wood spindle that I can travel with. I went to show my treasure at my home base, the Folktale/Middlebrook booth, and Anne did a test drive with some of her fiber. It’s lightweight and spins beautifully. I will treasure it always.  

    I also met up with Jennifer who curated the Twist Exhibition I was in last Fall. She was with her friend, Jolie, who created the other Star Wars story yarn from the show and it was so cool to finally meet her and talk about our yarn. The fiber world is small indeed.

    I went for a last look around the Main Hall and then headed out to the Lower Corral to stock up on some spinning fiber. Miss Babs was still hopping.

    Other inside vendors

    Feederbrook Farm has some of the nicest BFL washed locks you can find, so I bagged up a couple pounds (Oops! I had no idea I stuffed that much in there). I use the locks in my art yarn - I just love the little curls. Lisa also sells beautifully hand dyed yarn from her own flock of sheep.

    I had to buy some rainbow-y battlings at Hobbledehoy to lift my spirits as the clouds were still looming. I’m not sure what I will make with them yet, but it will be super cute no doubt.

    I waded through the mud a few tents over to say hi to my other fiber friend, Karen of Avalon Springs. Her colors are so amazing and bright and I always just stare in awe and take lots and lots of pictures.

    Outside vendors

    I wanted to get see the sheep so I went back up to the barns and saw Martha from Black Sheep Farm and her moorit colored yearling Merino ram, Cinnabar.

    He was competing for Best Overall Fleece and had already won ribbons for Champion Colored Merino and Best Natural Colored Fleece. I’ve previously bought a couple amazing fleeces from her so I was cheering him on. I think a longwool sheep ended up with the ribbon, but he was my favorite. Also pictured here is Letty (I photographed last year) showing her Karakul ram, Cleatus.

    One of the more photogenic breeds is Scottish Blackfaced sheep and they seem to always have the best lighting in the barns too. I met another photographer and the woman who raises them and we talked about a visit to see the farm. Their wool is not very soft and is better suited for a rug wool, but they are really beautiful to look at.

    Other sheep in the barns:

    Look at those ringlets!

    As I was leaving this sheep was looking to get some handouts. He was the size of a small pony. Thank goodness he didn’t try to break out in earnest.


    At the end of the day I collected my ribbons and entries from the competitions and headed back home. Another year come and gone by so fast. Where did the time go? Next year I hope to do a better job organizing a trip to the festival. Maybe on the Sunday when it's less crowded? Hope to see you there in 2018!

  • Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 Wrap-up

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Yet another year has come and gone so fast. I spent the last couple weeks getting prepped for Maryland Sheep and Wool and completing some projects I am working on. This year the weather was a bit iffy Saturday with lots of rain and soggy mud in the morning. It did clear up a bit in the afternoon and the sun came out so it was pretty enjoyable. I just had to remember to take all my fleece out to dry when I got home since a lot of things got damp Friday night.

    I took the bus again with the fabulous Cutthroat yarn crew Saturday morning. We got there nice and early and I scurried over to the Folktale Fibers and Middle Brook Fiberworks (formerly A Little Teapot Designs) booth in the Main Exhibition Hall to drop off my yarn I was selling there.

    Folktale Fibers, 222 Handspun art yarn -© 222handspun.com - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016

    Anne’s (Middle Brook Fiberworks) beautiful weaving

    Folktale Fibers, Middle Brook Fiber Works, 222 Handspun art yarn © 222handspun.com - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016

    My yarn is hanging with the pink ribbons

    Folktale Fibers, Middle Brook Fiber Works ,222 Handspun art yarn © 222handspun.com - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016

    Folktale Fibers, Middle Brook Fiber Works, 222 Handspun art yarn © 222handspun.com - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016

    Folktale Fibers, Middle Brook Fiber Works, 222 Handspun art yarn © 222handspun.com - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016

    I did the rounds and caught up with some of my fiber buddies, the talented Christiane of Three Ravens and Melissa of Wild Hare Fiber Studio. I bought some of Christiane's fabulous yarn to wear as un-knit necklace which I got compliments on all day.

    Wild Hare - © 222handspun.com - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016Wild Hare and Three Ravens- © 222handspun.com - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016

    I bought some really nice treats that I missed in previous years like Artichoke French. This is one of the few vegetarian options at the fairgrounds. Yeah, I know, I go to sheep shows and get all sad about the lamb chops - I’m one of those people.

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    I also bought some really yummy gluten and dairy free peanut butter choco chip cookies from Rare Opportunity Bakehouse. They were good enough to get me thinking about getting back to a gluten-free diet again. I started for health reasons years ago and fell off the wagon, more because it was hard to maintain, not because I didn’t feel a lot better. Sometimes you go to events thinking you will find inspiration for one thing, and end up be inspired by something else in an unexpected way.

    Talking about inspiration, I found some new to be vendors this year and had fun looking at all the beautiful items at the Skein and Garment Competition.

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    I didn’t win any first place yarn ribbons this year, but I got a 3rd, 4th, and 5th place. Considering two were for types of yarn I don’t spin often, I was pleased. I already have some ideas about what I want to make for next year too. This yarn was spun using baby BFL wool from Feederbrook Farm that I hand dyed. I wanted to preserve the beautiful soft curly locks so I didn’t card it or anything. I just spun it straight from the fleece and then plied it from a center pull ball.

    My Baby BFL Yarn

    Handspun Yarn - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    The Best in Show Ribbon was awarded to a beautiful yarn basket (1lb. + hand dyed yarn), with the basket knitted from that same yarn. It was really impressive.

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    My very talented friend Bridget (Bridget’s Farm Cart) won a ribbon for this felted wool painting. She uses wool from her sheep to delicately needlefelt these beautiful farm scenes.

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Lots of other lovely items at the competition:

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.comSkein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Skein and Garment Competition, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    The Fleece Show and Sale barn had a long line in the morning as usual so I went later in the day.

    Fleece Sales, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Despite their really good organization, it still took me about 40 minutes to check out. I only bought one fleece this year, a small Gotland. It was pricey but since I haven’t bought a Gotland before I figured this would be my one big splurge.

    Fleece Sales, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Fleece Sales, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Fleece Sales, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    The Show Ring and Sheep Barns

    BFL Sheep waiting for the show ring

    Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Saturday morning I got side tracked by the sheep and ended up spending some time watching and photographing the Karakuls in the show ring. I ran into Sue of Solitude Wool who raises Karakuls and she introduced me to Letty of Pine Lane Farm Karakuls. They are such a beautiful breed and she has one in particular, Appy, who is quite a handsome fella.

    UPDATE:

    I am told that Appy now lives in Colorado and his fleece Is in Texas. The little red and white ewe lamb, Sadie, and the black ewe lamb, Raine, both now live in PA. Good luck to all three in their new homes!

    Karakul Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Appy took home ribbons for champion Karakul ram and best fleece.

    Here he is winning a ribbon:

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Unlucky for me, his first fleece was already sold. Look at the colors and those curly lamb tips!

    Karakul Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Karakul Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Karakuls Judging

    Karakul Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Sadie

    Karakul Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.comMaryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Raine

    Karakul Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    I ran into Letty and Appy again on Sunday. Great timing.

    Karakul Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Lately I’ve become fascinated with sheep faces and profiles in particular. Probably because of the beauty and charm of the Bluefaced Leicesters’ distinctive roman nose.

    It amazes me how different they are so this year I took a bunch of photos of sheep faces to compare. 

    BFL (Bluefaced Leicester)

    Bluefaced Leicester (BFL) Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com Bluefaced Leicester (BFL) Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Bluefaced Leicester (BFL) Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Colored BFL

    Bluefaced Leicester (BFL) Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Bluefaced Leicester (BFL) Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Bluefaced Leicester (BFL) Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Merino

    Merino Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Colored Merino

    Merino Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Lincoln Longwool

    lincoln longwool sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Romney

    Romney Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Romney Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Romney

    Romney Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Romney Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Scottish Blackface Sheep

    Scottish Blackface Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Overhead view of the amazing horns

    Scottish Blackface Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Scottish Blackface Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Suffolk and Hampshire

    These were being raised by kids in one of the youth programs. I wish I caught their names.

    Suffolk and Hampshire sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Suffolk

    Suffolk sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Hampshire

    Hampshire sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Another stunning Karakul sheep

    Karakul Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Karakul Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Karakul Sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    American Teeswater

    American Teeswater Sheep - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Suri Alpaca (just seeing if you are paying attention)

    From Ameripaca Alpaca Breeding Co., Inc. - I bought some alpaca fleece from them.  

    alpaca - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Huacaya alpaca

    alpaca - Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    The parade of sheep was at the end of the day Sunday and I watched this giant Columbia X Rambouillet X Dorset being led out of a pen. He was the size of a pony. I can’t imagine shearing him.

    Columbia X Rambouillet X Dorset sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    parade of sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Jacob Sheep

    parade of sheep, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Sheep Shearing Demos

    Speaking of shearing, I got to watch award winning Emily Chamelin Hickman and Kristen Rosser do sheep shearing demos.

    sheep shearing demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    I love this face!

    sheep shearing demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    sheep shearing demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    All done!

    sheep shearing demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    sheep shearing demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.comMaryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.comMaryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Working Sheepdog Demonstrations

    I also watched Nancy Cox Starkey working with her Border Collies herding BFL sheep.

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

     Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Border Collies herding BFL sheep demo, Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Outside and Barn Vendors

    There was so much to see and do in the Lower Corral and the other barns. Here are a few of my favorites:

    Autumn House

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Avalon Springs

    I stopped by Karen's booth for some dyed silk and BFL locks in my favorite colors and this yarn caught my eye. This is my latest color obsession - gold, mustard, curry - whatever you call it I dig it a lot.

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Bartlett Yarn

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Feederbrook Farm

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    I bought some washed BFL X Longwool fleece and some Shetland roving.

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Good Karma Farm

    Yarn growing on trees!

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Grindstone Ridge Farm

    She was making a sweet needle felted Santa.

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Hobbledehoy

    I bought some really nice battlings here. Drool.

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Marigold Jen

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Some Jacob Sheep items from Spot Hollow Farm 

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Jill Draper Makes Stuff

    I bought one of these adorable little notebooks

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Loop

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Miss Babs

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    On The Round

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Sarafina Fiber Art

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Sheep Thrills

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Solitude Wool

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    The Bee Folks

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    The Wool Room

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Unique Designs By Kathy

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    After two very full days of yarn and fiber it was finally time to go home.

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com

    Here’s my haul. I found some unusual things this year - a couple favorites are the antique sheep print and toy and the sheep notebook from Jill Draper. I came home with lots of treasures and projects to work on this year!

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2016 - © 222handspun.com



     

  • Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival 2015 Wrap-up

    Maryland Sheep and Wool signAll images and content © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. To license an image please contact 222 Handspun

    Sit back and grab a cup of coffee because this is going to be a long one!

    Last weekend I went to the 42nd Annual Maryland Sheep & Wool Festival (MDSW) which is one of largest and one of the longest running fiber festivals in the United States. They were also celebrating the 25th Anniversary of Leicester Longwool sheep returning to the U.S. 

    For those who are not familiar, the event features over 200 vendors, fleece sales, classes and workshops, sheep breed shows, skein and garment and sheep to shawl competitions, sheepdog and shearing demos, and live entertainment. It’s held over the first weekend in May at the Howard County Fairgrounds in West Friendship, Maryland and about 60,000 – 70, 000 people attend each year.

    Festival Entrance - Saturday Morning Early Shoppers

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Maryland Sheep and Wool entrance

    Leicester Longwool Sheep

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Leicester Longwool sheep

    On Saturday I took a bus from my local yarn shop, Cutthroat Yarn in Leesburg, VA, and I got to hang out with a really fun group of ladies. I took a bus for a few reasons: 1) It forced me to get up and go really early. 2) I didn't have to drive so I could enjoy the scenery and conversation. 3) It's a chance to meet other people who are just as crazy about fiber as myself (or close to it).

    They had breakfast food and drinks and were crocheting matching headbands for everyone. We made good time and got there early at around 8:45.

    Cutthroat Yarn Bus Trip to MDSW

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. Cutthroat Yarn bus

    Cutthroat Yarn Bus Trip to MDSW

    Cutthroat Yarn bus

    Arriving at the Festival

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW

    There is an air of excitement as you approach the festival. They were already letting people in the gates early and you could see vendors scurrying to complete their last minute preparations. The Central Maryland Knitting Guild did the yarn bombing for the festival again this year and they did a fabulous making the path to the main gate look festive and inviting.

    Yarn Bombed Fence

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Yarn bomb

    Yarn Bombed Tree

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Yarn bomb

    Yarn Bombed Tree

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Yarn bomb

    Yarn Bombed Fence

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Yarn bomb

    Yarn Bombed Fence

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Yarn bomb

    I spent a full Saturday and better part of Sunday visiting and talking with as many friends (new and old) and sheep as I possibly could. The weather was great and there was lots of food and folk music to enjoy while you shopped or relaxed in the shade. There is a lot to see and do besides shopping from sheep herding and shearing demos, to entering contests and competitions. 

    For first time attendees it can seem a bit overwhelming, especially on a Saturday. You will find long lines for some of the necessities such as the fleece sale, a few very popular vendors, restrooms, and food trucks (in that priority order!). But don’t let the lines deter you. That’s where you meet the best people and kindred spirits and you get to talk about your love of all things fibery and not seem weird at all.

    Lining up for the Fleece Sale Early Saturday Morning

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Fleece Sale

    Festival Lunchtime Crowd

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival crowd

    Relaxing and Spinning in the Shade

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW festival crowd

    Sheep Going For a Walk

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Border Leicester sheep

    As soon as I arrived, I passed the line for the Fleece Sales and I made my way to the Main Exhibition Hall to drop off some handspun yarn I had the honor of consigning in Folktale Fibers / A Little Teapot Designs booth. They were a late addition to the festival this year and as first time vendors, did an amazing job pulling it all together last minute. These are some super-talented ladies and I was so happy to hang out and be a tiny part of their fibery world for a couple days.

    Big Pile O' 222 Handspun Yarn

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    222 Handspun yarn MDSW 2015

    Folktale Fibers

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Folktale Fibers Booth

    Spot the 222 Handspun Yarn!

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth featuring 222 Handspun

    A Little Teapot Designs

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    Fiber Bonsai Trees. How cute are these?

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    I had to get some of this honey and oatmeal soap. I couldn't resist handmade soap that looks and smells this good.

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    Folktale Fibers Handspun Yarn. Yarn rainbows. 'Nuf said. They disappeared in the first hour or so before I had a chance to snag one.

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    A Little Teapot Designs Jewelry

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    A Little Teapot Designs Handspun Yarn. I couldn't stop petting this yummy soft yarn!

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    Making Some Fresh Art Batts

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Folktale Fibers and a Little Teapot booth

    Sunday - Anne Spinning Yarn  

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Spinning yarn - a Little Teapot booth

    Spinning yarn - a Little Teapot booth

    Next, I went to say hi to my buddies at Wild Hare Fiber Studio's booth. I’m always attracted to anything bright/neon and Melissa had the coolest animated sign outfitted with a blacklight to show off her neon yarn. 

    Wild Hare Fiber Studio

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Wild Hare Fiber Studio

    Wild Hare Fiber Studio

    Three Ravens was sharing the booth space and had some yummy squishy hand dyed faux cashmere top in bright colors that I grabbed right away. I also picked up some special order size 100 knitting needles that are going to be a gift for someone. I kind of want to keep them though because they look so cool (even thought I don't knit). They kind of inspire me to want to learn.

    Three Ravens Fiber 

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Three Ravens

    I made a quick stop to say hi to my friends at Solitude Wool and checked out all their pretty yarn and fiber. If you haven't tried their new Llama-rama yarn you need to. It's a lovely soft blend of Virginia grown 50% llama & 50% Romney wool. 

    Solitude Wool

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Solitude Wool

    Solitude Wool

    I hurried over to Loop to get my bullseye bump fix. I was not going to miss out this year no matter how packed it was in there!

    Main Exhibit Hall Shoppers

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Main Exhibition Hall

    I pushed my way in and grabbed two bumps and got out. 

    Loop Bulleseye Bumps

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Loop Fiber

    I didn't want to miss the Fleece Sale this year either, so by the time I had gotten set up in the booth and shopped a bit, the line to get in had mellowed out. There were literaly piles of bags of fleece so deep on the table on the left that I couldn't see them all. I just grabbed a BFL and Merino and got in the check out line. They are two staples that I will dye and add to art batts. I have enough colored merino so I went with the white. I really should have taken a closer look at some of the more hard to find breeds but it was too chaotic for me and I didn't have a plan.

    Note to self: Know what you are looking for before going to the fleece sale, otherwise you may spend a lot of time aimlessly looking in bags of fleece and trying to remember what you just looked at on the other side of the room. It can be a bit like the wedding dress sale at Filene's Basement. Have a price in mind that you are willing to pay for a breed and VM (vegetable matter) state (covered or uncovered?) as well as a total budget. If you can get a buddy to go with you, you can split a fleece. I did not have a fleece buddy and missed out on some nice ones that were just too much for me. 

    Fleece Show and Sales - Showing different breed samples

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Fleece Sale

    Fleece Sale

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Fleece Sale

    Piles of Fleece 

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Fleece Sale

    Colored Wool

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Fleece Sale

    My BFL Fleece

    It's pretty dirty but I think it will wash up nice. Good price at $36. 

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Fleece Sale BFL

    My Merino Fleece

    A nice cleaned covered fleece. Sound with no breaks and good staple length. Fairly soft and good overall for the price.

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    merino wool fleece

    This year, I tried something for the first time. I entered the Skein Competition. I have to admit I was pretty sure I wouldn't do very well because most of my yarn is not very traditional and other competition winners that I have seen usually are all pretty uniform and neutral looking. Not that that's a bad thing. I really admire a well-spun perfectly balanced fingering weight yarn in natural gray, that's just not what I usually make. So I had myself convinced it was a wasted effort, but I was up for proving myself wrong.

    I entered three yarns, one that I actually really liked which was a worsted N-Ply "traditional" style yarn from a Loop bullseye bump in the Plied category, a super bulky 2-ply with beehive coils in shades of bright lavender, and a "story" art yarn (both in the Novelty category).

    I walked into the Skein and Garment Competition building and went to the back where the yarn was and I spotted my traditional style yarn. No ribbon. I thought OK, I'll do better next time.

    Then I went to the other table with ribbons and my Lavender beehive yarn had a second place ribbon! I was so excited but I couldn't see my other yarn. My first thought was they tossed it because they didn't know what it was or something. Feeling a bit confused, I went back to the front and there on the table where you walk in was my Monster Mash-up Story yarn! I had walked right by it. It had a blue first place ribbon and a special award ribbon for the Novelty class. I was so excited. Not just because I had won my first ever skein competition, but the fact that the judges "got" my crazy looking art yarn. So I guess you never know until you try and this was really encouraging for art spinners like myself. Here are my skeins and descriptions:

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. MDSW 2015 ribbons-skein competition

    “Friendly Monster - Mash Up” Story Yarn. S11 Expressive (novelty) yarn. First Place and Special Award - Novelty Yarn Category

    Fiber content: wool, llama locks, recycled sari silk, cashmere, acrylic. Corespun, autowrapped, coiled, and chain plied. 18 Yards, 2.7 Ounces

    This is a highly textured story yarn meant to be worn on its own or used as an embellishment in a finished piece. This was wheel-spun using a combination of some of my favorite fiber I've collected recently, much of it from locally grown farm fleece that I processed, drum carded, and dyed. I combined several techniques to trap wild locks and suspend more delicate fibers. 

    It tells the story of a friendly but misunderstood monster, with each section of the yarn representing a moment it's journey to love and acceptance. Or, it's just a really weird looking yarn. Your call.

    MDSW 2015 ribbons-Special Award Novelty Skein

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    “Lavender Bunches” S11 Expressive (novelty) yarn. Second Place Novelty Yarn Category

    Fiber content: Merino and Corriedale X Wool, Angelina, Recycled Sari Silk. 46 Yards, 3.5 Ounces

    I wanted a soft and bouncy yarn with that could be used for next-to-skin soft wearables like a knitted cowl or scarf. I started by drum carding top (some I dyed myself) with sari silk and Angelina fiber then I spun two singles on a wheel, one very thin and the other thick and thin, and then plied them together. 

    This was inspired by a photo I took of bunches of dried lavender tied in purple ribbon.

    MDSW 2015 2nd place-novelty yarn

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Skein and Garment Competition Special Awards

    These were the Special Award winning skeins. The junior category winners were really impressive. Coincidentally I ran into the Junior winner with the purple skein at lunch. She was very excited and I was really happy for her. It's so cool to have that much talent at that age. 

    MDSW special awards skein competition

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    This was just stunning.MDSW 1st place skein competition

    This shawl was knitted from yarn spun from an entire handspun Jacob fleece and won Best in Show.

    Best in Show Shawl

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW 2015 skein and garment competition

    Photo Competition

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW photo competition

    Over the years I have developed relationships with other spinners, fiber artists, and farmers and this is my main opportunity to catch up with them and do some serious shopping. Although I got to see the vendors I really wanted to, I missed a lot of people I had hoped to run into that I basically only know online. I think I'll have to do a better job next year planning a meeting place and teaming up for the fleece sale etc.

    What I really like about this event is that it’s not just for knitters. There is a big hand spinning community in the area and many vendors cater to art yarn spinners and carry premium fiber in an amazing array of colors and textures. If you are looking for eco-friendly small farm raised fleece and rare breeds you will not be disappointed by the huge selection.

    One of my favorite vendors is Avalon Springs Farm. Besides gorgeous hand dyed yarns from her own fiber animals, Karen carries Blue Faced Leicester wool locks in my favorite color, hot pink, which I always make a point of stocking up on. I really hope to visit her farm this year and photograph the sheep.

    Avalon Springs Farm 

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Avalon Springs Farm

    Another great source for hand spinning fiber and some of the softest, loveliest wool you'll find in the greater DC area is Feederbrook Farm. I bought a bunch of hand dyed BFL locks and some natural colored washed fleece here too. 

    Feederbrook Farm 

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Feederbrook Farm

    Feederbrook Farm

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Feederbrook Farm

    Hobbledehoy is a another favorite of mine with her bright colors and luxury fiber batts. My only problem here is deciding which ones to choose so I got a couple.

    Hobbledehoy

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Hobbledehoy - 222 Handspun

    Hobbledehoy - 222 Handspun

    The force runs deep in this family. Liz shares a booth with her talented mother, MarigoldJen.

    Yarn From Marigodjen

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Marigoldjen - 222 Handspun

    Outdoor Vendors

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Vendors - 222 Handspun

    Dancing Leaf Farm

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Dancing Leaf - 222 Handspun

    Felted Wool 

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    wool - 222 Handspun

    One of my favorite activities at the festival is watching the Sheepdog Herding Demos. They usually have some less experienced dogs mixed in with the older ones and it’s really fun to watch them do their job so enthusiastically. The demo I went to had some seemingly laid back Bluefaced Leicesters and a young sheepdog who was very eager to herd them. He did a great job despite not wanting to “lie down” when he was asked a number of times.

    Sheep Herding Demo

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    It’s amazing how the sheep really stick together as a tight unit. I was admiring the way their fleece swayed as they ran around the ring.

    Sheep Running Together

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    Sheepdog Getting the “Lie Down” Command (Again)

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    MDSW Sheep Herding demo - 222 Handspun

    Sheep, sheep, and lots of sheep. I missed them last year so I was determined to get some photos this time around. They had lots of ewes with their little lambs in the barns, which of course meant every time someone walked by there were “oohs” and “ahhs” (myself included).

    Bluefaced Leicester Lamb

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    lamb - 222 Handspun

    Gotland Lamb

    Gotland Lamb - 222 Handspun

     © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Bluefaced Leicester Sheep

    BFL sheep - 222 Handspun

    Natural Colored Border Leicester Sheep

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

     - 222 Handspun

     Border Leicester Sheep Border Leicester sheep - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    American Teeswater Sheep 

    American Teeswater sheep - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    American Teeswater Sheep

    American Teeswater sheep - 222 Handspun

    American Teeswater Sheep 

    American Teeswater sheep - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Hog Island Sheep

    Hog Island Sheep - 222 Handspun

    Romney Sheep

    Romney sheep - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Romney Sheep

    Romney sheep - 222 Handspun

    Romney Sheep

    Romney sheep - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Jacob Sheep

    Jacob Sheep - 222 Handspun

    Border Cheviot Sheep

    Border Cheviot - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Leicester Longwool Sheep

    leicester longwool Sheep - 222 Handspun

    Getting Ready for the Show Ring

    Showring - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    The Show Ring

    Showring - 222 Handspun

    © Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce or share without written permission and attribution. 

    Posing at the Show Ring

    Showring - 222 Handspun

    Each year I go back, it seems I know more and more people and get to make new friends from all over when standing in the line to buy fleece or just chatting on a bench outside. “What did you buy?” or “Did you make that?” are great conversation openers. I always bring business cards with me and have Facebook and Instagram open so I can follow other fiber enthusiasts whose names I might otherwise forget.

    How do you best enjoy a huge festival like Maryland Sheep and Wool? My advice is to plan ahead. I wrote down the booths I wanted to go to and circled them on the vendor map the day before. I brought some cash, but most everyone takes credit cards (except the lemonade stand and some food vendors). If you can carpool or take a bus, that’s a nice way to enjoy the ride.

    So pack some snacks and water, wear walking shoes, and bring extra-large collapsible bags. You never know when you might score a freshly shorn fleece just about to be thrown out with the trash like I did late Sunday afternoon. Remember to keep your eyes and ears open (free fleece!), and don’t be afraid to ask questions or chat with strangers. Most of all have fun!

    My Saturday Haul. I managed to check of all my to do list items plus a little more.

    MDSW haul - 222 Handspun

    My score of the day - the mystery trash fleece that is actually pretty nice.

    Here it is after I skirted it.

    trash fleece - 222 Handspun

    All images copyright 2015 Elysa Darling. Do not reproduce without permission. 

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  • Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival - 2014

    Yesterday I made my annual trek to Maryland Sheep and Wool Festival (MDSW). I've been going there for the last several years and I'm lucky enough to live within about an hour and 15 minutes away. I wanted to catch up with some fiber friends but sadly I got a late start and missed some people. I did get a chance to visit my favorite booths though and take some pictures. I didn't really get to see the animals because I spent so much time chatting with people. Next year I'll try to get more pictures of the woolly critters. Luckily the weather was gorgeous and so were all the fibery displays. 

    Here is my haul with Bleu doing the usual inspection:

    I really loved the yarn bombed fence line leading up to the main gate. Some volunteers really took the time to go all out. How fun is that?

    My first stop on the way in was Dancing Leaf Farm's booth where I purchased a really cool handspun yarn necklace from the very talented and always lovely Dalis (who was kind enough to pose for a quick picture in her booth).

    My new necklace (crappy iPhone pic, sorry):

    Outside Dancing Leaf Farm's booth

    Inside Dancing Leaf Farm's Booth

    Fibery Goodies Inside Dancing Leaf Farm's Booth

    Yummy Yarn Inside Dancing Leaf Farm's Booth

    My next stop was Mangham Wool Farm where I couldn't resist buying some fuchsia sari silk ribbon and Knit Collage yarn from this gorgeous display:

    I made my way around the outside vendors and stopped by to say hi to Kate of Gourmet Stash where I bought some of that hand dyed green merino top in the center of the pic and some SOAK wash for my yarn. She had reminded me that I wanted some and had a stash set aside. It smells great. I can't wait to use it on my next yarn rinse.

    This was her first year at MDSW and she really did a great job pulling it all together. I don't think people realize how much preparation goes into getting ready for a show like this months beforehand. We're talking pounds and pounds of hand carded punis. Congrats to her.

    Another favorite vendor of mine is Lavender Hills Farm. They raise cormo sheep which is one of the absolute nicest types of wool. I stopped in and chatted for a long time and picked up some roving from them. They also had some Angora bunnies in the tent. One day I will come home with one, I swear. I wonder what my cats would do?

    Walking To The Lower Corral and Main Exhibition Barn

    Next I walked down the hill to the Lower Corral area. There were a bunch of booths there that I always make a point of visiting. The first one was Avalon Springs Farm. I usually buy hand dyed BFL fleece and silk from her and of course, stop to chat. Karen is super nice and doesn't mind me asking all sort of questions. We got to talking about photography too, which is one of my favorite subjects (I was using my Nikon D5100). Here she is with friends and family:

    Inside Avalon Springs Farm Booth

    This dyed cultivated silk is gorgeous. I've been using it in my art batts.

    Inside Avalon Springs Farm Booth

    Outside Avalon Springs Farm Booth

    A new discovery for me was Rainbow Rapunzel. Her booth is so whimsical and full of colorful freespirited yarn. I'm so happy I stopped in. I ended up getting some cool old mill spindles and some dyed fiber.  I also got some yarn by the yard. She has a really cool display for some huge skeins on giant spools like they use for industrial wire reels. I almost got a tiara too but I don't think I could pull it off ;)

    I didn't know it at the time but one of my fellow fibertistas whom I know through Facebook, Stacy, was helping out in the booth. We were talking but I didn't know it was her until I got home. It's funny how I know a lot of people in the fiber community online-only and wouldn’t recognize them if I saw them on the street, or in this case, MDSW. I did immediately recognize the OMG crochet hook from Three Ravens hanging on the rack though. You can't miss it! This was a custom order for her that Rob delivered at the festival. There are lots of jokes about that one. I have a smaller version that is still ginormous.

    Hand Dyed Fiber at Rainbow Rapunzel

    I grabbed some of this fibery goodness too.

    Rainbow Rapunzel's Booth

    Check out the giant spools of yarn on the left!

    Here's some of the yarn from a giant spool (crappy iPhone pic, sorry)

    Outside Rainbow Rapunzel's Booth

    A perennial favorite is Hobbledehoy. She has such a great sense of color and texture. I fell in love with all of this yarn:

    And I bought some batt-letts too

    I stopped to take an Instagram since she said I should do so on this sign in order to win some goodies: (bonus points for the awesome marketing by the way)

    Last stop in the Lower Corral was Feederbrook Farm. They raise BFL, Teeswater, and Shetland sheep. She's super nice and I chatted with her for a while as I bought some of her gorgeous undyed and dyed BFL locks. I'm going to wait till the Fall and see what she has for Teeswater fleece. That's something to look forward too.

    Inside Feederbrook Farm's Booth

    Inside Feederbrook Farm's Booth

    Dyed BFL Locks and Raw Shetland Fleece from Feederbrook Farm

    Into the Main Exhibition Hall I found Susan's Fiber Shop. She was featuring yarn and fiber from Jazzturtle, Wild Hare, and a brand new 'pick me picker' which I missed apparently in all the chaos. 

    Jazzturtle

    Susan's Fiber Shop Booth

    This looks like Ashland Bay merino top. I like this display. Did you know I'm an Ashland Bay dealer? I always forget to mention that. I'm probably going to start listing their fiber in my Etsy store soon.

    Then, I stopped by Loop and was confronted with this wall of awesomeness:

    They looked wiped since it was the end of the day, but she was gracious nonetheless and I bought some spinning cloud fiber from her. I admired her handspun yarn while I waited to check out.

    The troll doll one was the best. I love how her yarn is all so fat and ropey. I found so much inspiration on this trip. I'm gonna try more corespinning when my Aura wheel with the Overdrive Head finally arrives.

    One last look at Loop. Ahhh....

    I had to swing by Solitude Wool and pick up some Clun Forest roving in this amazing peachy salmon color. I think I've bought most of what they have in that colorway. They were still busy and I was tired, so I didn't stay for too long. After the main barn I had to get some food for the road. They always have really good fresh squeezed lemonade, which totally hit the spot. As I made my way back to the parking lot, I paused to take some pictures of the yarn bombs.

    Some final thoughts and minor regrets (what's a journey without a few regrets, I say?)

    * I wish I had the energy to go back on Sunday but I was just too pooped. I got a late start on Saturday and didn't see all the things. I also missed some folks I wanted to meet. We introverts need to recharge after a long day, after all.

    * I totally forgot to get Maple Sugar from Justameer. Dangnabbit. I get some every year - it's tradition! (even though I haven't used up last year's yet).

    * I forgot to ask what fiber was in the spontaneous spinning cloud floof I bought from Loop. I was also so overwhelmed with the self-striping bumps in her Wall of Awesomeness at the end of the day that I didn't even buy one. I should have just grabbed one, any one.

    * I always lose my car. This year I even took a picture of the sign where I was parked in "D" (as in Darling) section on my iPhone when I got there. My proof:

    I still couldn't find it and I was so fed up and tired, so I enlisted help from the boyscouts who looked bored and were tooling around in a pair of golf carts since there wasn't much traffic to direct anymore. (OK, I was tired, walking up hill 2x in the long grass and carrying two giants bags of fiber, with a blister on my foot - all after not eating lunch yet at 4:00). The troop master sarcastically remarked that no one in 40 some odd years of the festival had ever lost their car, especially since they put up signs. Yeah, yeah. Funny. I'm that girl, OK?

    So then he asked me for a description of the car, which I realized is sooooo generic (gray Toyota Sienna) until a light bulb went on in my head and I blurted out "The license plate says YARNIE, it's a Virgina Farming plate". Thank goodness for that - a distinguishing feature. I knew there was a reason to get a vanity plate. One of them remarked that he remembered seeing the YARNIE license plate earlier and thought it was cool, so he was sure we'd find it in no time. They got all excited by the mission (I think they were super bored at this point in the day) and I hopped in one of the golf carts and the boyscouts had a race to find my yarn mobile. We whizzed up and down the rows and aisles at top speed. I had been warned by the troopmaster that none of them had driver's licenses yet, but somehow I was feeling reckless, albeit a little old at the same time. But that's a story for another day.

    Sure enough, our cart won the race and I got in my car and promptly ate my cold grilled cheese sandwich and remaining sip of fresh squeezed lemonade that I bought with my leftover cash. I had exactly one dollar left in my pocketbook. Just then it started to rain a little bit.That was a fun ending to the day.